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Accessible Travel Guide: Brussels

Brussels is the capital of many things: of Belgium, of the Flemish region, of the Brussels – Capital region and although the European Union has no official capital, most of its institutions are based here. Officially a bilingual city (French and Flemish), it hosts a vibrant multilingual community of foreigners who work and thrive here, making it a truly international environment where English is spoken almost everywhere.

Although not a classic destination for holidaymakers, it has grown and is well equipped with restaurants, bars, museums and a lively musical and cultural scene. It is not a very accessible city for people who use a wheelchair, but due to the fact that it is small, and with a few tips from the locals, it can make for a nice long-weekend break.
The guide “Brussels in wheelchair” that you will find available for download at the link below is a good reference although it dates from 2016.

Culture and museums

The main musems of the city are accessible and highly enjoyable, but they are located in the higher part of town, so plan your itinerary carefully.
The Royal Museum of Fine Arts is 4 museums in one: it hosts collections from the Middle Ages to Contemporary Arts, with the charming Musée Fin de Siécle (End of Century) which will be a fundamental guide for you to appreciate the Art Nouveau and Art Déco architecture around town (information on access here). Also entirely accessible is the MIM (Museum of Musical Instruments). You can climb all the floors via an ancient and spacious lift and – local tip! – watch the city view from the terrace, the access to which is free for everyone, while the museum entrance is free for people with disabilities and accompanying persons).
If you fancy an exhibition or a concert, the Bozar has a wonderful program and is well worth the visit. It is located in a majestic building from the 1920s and has some steps, but if you reserve your visit assistance is provided.
There is of course much more, and useful resources are available in the website “Brussels for all”, with specific information (also in English) to help you plan your visit.

Nature

This is a green city! Many parks are scattered in the centre and in the outer part of Brusssels, with an entire forest (the Sonian Forest) available for you. Parks are generally accessible, at least partially, and we can recommend the Bois de la Cambre (info on access here) with it’s lovely lake, and the tiny Parc d’Egmont, which you can access with your wheelchair through the gate on the left of the entrance of The Hotel on Avenue Louise (the entrance on the other side has steps). Step in and chill out, forgetting the city noises.



Food and (lots of) beer

Firstly you have to take into account that most restaurants and bars do not have an accessible toilet, but you will find the map of the accessible toilets in the “Brussels in wheelchair” guide. Mostly, it’s easier to use the toilets of the main hotels in the centre, as they are accessible and available at no charge for people with mobility special needs.
Having said this, you can enjoy “moules frites” (muscles and fries) and lovely traditional and international food in a lot of restaurants, as most have an open air terrace that is accessible. The beer is great everywhere! The area of Saint-Géry, in the centre, is lively and fun and at the Halles Saint-Géry there is an accessible toilet (and venue for a drink, a bite, a monthly vintage market and music!).

In the area of Sainte Catherine, 5 minutes walk from Saint-Géry, lots of bars and restaurants have terraces and if you want a tasty fish “tapas” and a glass of wine or a beer to eat in the street, Nordzee is the place for you.

Accessible concerts

Music! The main music venues in Brussels have an international high-quality programme and are wonderfully accessible: check out Ancienne Belgique  and Flagey. The Botanique is also a great venue, to access with your wheelchair you have to alert the staff and access through the beautiful park. A ramp will be placed and there is an accessible toilet that you can reach via an elevator.

If you are in for a biiig concert, Forest National is the place. Whether you like a musical or a rock concert, the big guns play here, so make sure you get a ticket in time as concerts sell out fast here!

General Accessibility of the area

Tip: Since most bars and restaurants do not have accessible toilets, when in the centre ask at major hotels to let you use their toilets, they are free and equipped

Brussels is a complex city when it comes to circulating with a wheelchair or a walker: the centre has quite some cobblestone pavements which are not always very even, but is mainly pedestrian only and is rather small, therefore it can be visited in a short time. Also, the Visit Flanders touristic office is right next to the main square and it is a nice pit stop to get some inspiration and brochures for the continuation of your trip in the Flemish part of Belgium. They have brochures entirely dedicated to accessible itineraries and resources.

Just out of the historic cobblestone centre is a wide pedestrian area which is nice for a stroll and to see some comics (but the comic book stores are not easily accessible), while the Rue Neuve and the Place de la Monnaie (the Opera), which are adjacent, are rather easy pedestrian areas with shops on street level (and Uniqlo, the Japanese brand of clothes, has also a wide elevator and accessible changing rooms, larger and with a special seat!).

Public transport is also complex and not ideal: some lines have buses equipped with a ramp, but not all buses on the same line are guaranteed to be accessible, so you may have to wait a bit for the right one to come. A full list of the accessible bus lines and the accessible metro stop is available at the link below. To take the metro by yourself you will need to contact assistance prior to your journey and they will follow you around with a ramp from the beginning of your trip to the end, while on buses that have a specific symbol you can get on and off independently (check the link for more information).
The locals know their way and have often a portable ramp, but if you are new, it is better to plan your public transport trips in advance and book the service at the public transport company (STIB/MIVB), they are usually on time. You can try to get assistance at a metro stop with personnel on the spot and during working hours (from 7 to 22), but this way it is not guaranteed that you won’t have to wait ages or the service may not be available.

Same procedure on the train: you have to book in advance your assistance and they are always very nice, but make sure to check out your destination as not all train stations are accessible, so you want to know beforehand how they will take you down the train and then out of the actual station.

Accessible toilets are a big issue: most bars and restaurants have one or more steps to get in and have toilets in the basement, down a flight of stairs. This is very common and frustrating, but the luxury hotels in the centre of town offer their accessible toilets for free also to non-guests, so do not be shy and ask at the reception. Accessible toilets in hotels in the centre are at the Novotel Brussels off Grand Place, the Marriott Grand Place and the Hotel Amigo.
An accessible café/restaurant with accessible toilets is the Halles Saint-Géry, you have to first ask at the bar for the keys and there is an elevator that will take you there.
In the shopping street Rue Neuve, and in the Louise area (other, more luxury, shopping spot) you will find the Gallerie Inno, large department stores that also have accessible toilets.


Accessible metro stops map – for download


Accessibility in public transport – general information


Accessibility of trains – general information, online form and telephone number to book assistance


Bruxelles en fauteil (Brussels in wheelchair) – Please note that the guide is only in French and Dutch but the maps are easy to read

Airport Accessibility

To reach Brussels there are two airports: Brussels National Airport (BRU) and Brussels South Charleroi Airport (CRL).
Both have passengers with reduced mobility services, Brussels National is larger and has accessibility features such as ramps and lifts, Charleroi is smaller but is also equipped.
Transport from the National airport to the centre of Brussels with public transport is either via train (you can book assistance online at the link in the paragraph above “Trains”) or by bus. The bus number 12 gets you from Brussels National Airport to the European area and is wheelchair accessible. However sometimes the ramp does not work, so you have to wait for the next, but the bus passes rather often.
From Charleroi airport there are only buses, but they have steps to get on board and they stop at the south station, Brussels Midi. A possible option is therefore a private adapted shuttle service, which can be more expensive than the train from Brussels National, unless you are travelling in a small group, when it may be a smart option. Take this into consideration when booking your flight.

Brussels National Airport – Information on accessibility and special assistance 


Charleroi Airport- Information on accessibility and special assistance 


Practical resources

If you need transport, accommodation or medical services, consult our Brussels resources page.

 

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